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Part II - The Lost Worlds of the Deep

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  • Part II - The Lost Worlds of the Deep

    Source: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explor...s/welcome.html

    A gadid forages for prey among basalt and the invertebrates attached to it.


    A gadid forages for prey among basalt and the invertebrates attached to it.


    A grenadier exhibits a head-down foraging posture, while drifting over the seamount landscape.


    Octocorals Metallogorgia sp. (center) and Paramuricea sp. (lower left) on Kelvin Seamount.


    A brittle star, genus Asteroschema, with its arms entwined around the branches of the octocoral, Metallogorgia sp. The brittle star extends its arms to feed on small plankton that drift by.




    A widely distributed aggregation of Paramurecia on mud draped rock outcrop in Oceanographer Canyon at 865 m depth, taken from a camera sled in 1978. Photo: Barbara Hecker


    Chemosynthetic seep mussel, Bathymodiolus sp., lives with symbiotic bacteria in its gills that are able to use gas and hydrogen sulfide for carbon and energy.


    IFE ROV Hercules collects corals in a "forest" of bamboo whip corals on Balanus Seamount. Image courtesy of the Mountains in the Sea Research Team; the IFE Crew; and NOAA.


    Black coral on Retriever Seamount. Image courtesy of the Mountains in the Sea Research Team; the IFE Crew; and NOAA.


    Various species of corals and sponges on Retriever Seamount. Image courtesy of the Mountains in the Sea Research Team; the IFE Crew; and NOAA.


    A crab strikes an aggressive pose to protect this oasis of spectacular diversity. Image courtesy of the Mountains in the Sea Research Team; the IFE Crew; and NOAA.


    A mola mola soaks up the sun. Image courtesy of Jon Moore.


    A bouquet of Corallium, with deep purple Trachythela octocoral, brittle stars, crinoids, and sponges. Image courtesy of the Mountains in the Sea Research Team; the IFE Crew; and NOAA.


    A phenomenal line-up of organisms representing the great diversity on Balanus Seamount: a strange spoon worm, an elegant sea pen, a stalked crinoid, and two xenophyophores with brittle stars. Image courtesy of the Mountains in the Sea Research Team; the IFE Crew; and NOAA.


    Mercer Brugler proudly displays Iridigorgia. Image courtesy of D. Payne.


    A close look at Metallogorgia with a basket star.


    Black whip-like coral, Stichopathes


    Graduate student Mercer Brugler pulls at the highly viscous mucus collected from a bushy black coral.


    A chimaera swims by during larval block recovery on Manning Seamount


    A chimaera on Bear Seamount.


    An antimora over a sandy portion of seamount.


    A roundnose in a head-down swimming posture.


    An assemblage of underwater fauna representing the rich and diverse creatures viewed on ROPOS Dive R602 in the deeper portion of Astoria Canyon. In this image we see a black skate (middle), grenadier (upper left), sponges and anemones (foreground).


    Though the blue fish in this photo, perhaps an eelpout, immediately stands out, the "lebensspuren" (animal tracks, burrows and other signs of life) are just as interesting. The high density of lebensspuren indicate a low current environment.


    Dr. John Caruso holds two anglerfish specimens caught during a submersible dive.


    Rare fish in the Bathygadid family




    This deep-sea fish called a green eye exhibits a beautiful iridescent pattern around its large eyes and head.


    The exploration team took this picture of an unidentified frogfish at Davidson Seamount.


    This odd pair came together in a most unusual way. As the ROV was positioning to take a still photo of the redeye gaper fish, the brittle star, in the same beautiful shade of pink, swam furiously into view and positioned itself for a photo opportunity.


    A gaper rests on its pectoral and pelvic fins at a depth of 1,860 ft. Tape 3417-1 (11:38)


    A grenadier or "rattail" hovers near the bottom in a typical head-down posture at a depth of 1,850 ft. Tape 3417-2 (09:10).


    A deep-sea anglerfish collected during the 2002 Bear Seamount cruise. Photo by Jon Moore.

  • #2
    This six-gill shark was captured on video this morning when the team dove to recover the Eye-in-the-Sea camera system. These sharks, marked by six gills instead of the more common five, have been observed over 1,800-m deep.


    Dr. Frank holds a hagfish caught in one of the benthic traps. These fish appear to be prevalent at the Brine Pool.


    Galatheid crabs and shrimp graze on bacterial filaments on the mussel shells. The black "scars: on the shells are former anchor points of mussels who have cut their threads and moved on.


    At NW Eifuku volcano, mussels are so dense in some places that they obscure the bottom. The mussels are ~18 cm (7 in) long. The white galatheid crabs are ~6 cm (2.5 in) long.


    Unusual spiny crab spotted on NW Rota 1 volcano. Crabs are opportunistic predators at vent sites. The body of this crab is ~2 in. (~5 cm) across.




    Corals can also grow on other corals. Here we see a colony of the primnoid Callogorgia with Gerardia sp. growing over it. An unbranched basket star in the genus Asteroschema has also made its home on this colony

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    • #3
      eewwww cool!
      Proud owner of an Elegance Coral "that lived". (It is thriving whith long tentacle tips...purchased in January 2005.) It has white tentacle tips, I beleive this has something to do with ones that will typically live due to the collection site.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Adam
        eewwww cool!
        Agreed LOL!

        Thx again Edward.
        Josh
        System: 430ltr SPS ZEOvit system, Balling Method (Growtech), BubbleKing200, Profilux with LAN and Salinity
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        BlauRiff

        "I love the smell of Napalm in the morning"

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        • #5
          your pics always amaze me
          Nick
          Nick
          180G SPS Mainly
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