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Montipora Aequituberculata

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  • Montipora Aequituberculata



    Images from Splash

    Latin name: Montipora aequituberculata
    Discovered from / Year: Bernard, 1897
    Growth: slow / medium grower
    Degree of difficulty: easy - medium for advanced reefers
    Lighting: low / medium (bulb)
    Current: low / medium

    Reference: http://data.aims.gov.au/coralpages/h...0pages/245.htm

    Members please post your experiences & pictures in this thread to this species.
    Last edited by G.Alexander; 07-07-2009, 04:17 AM.

  • #2
    what makes it diffrent from a cap ?
    Nick
    Nick
    180G SPS Mainly
    10 Bulb T5 Starfire
    Calcium Reactor
    3 Tunze 6105's
    Profilux Controller
    ATB Return w/ wavysea
    ATB M External Skimmer


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    • #3
      Originally posted by nyfireman3097
      what makes it diffrent from a cap ?
      Nick

      Look close at the coralites and the what makes the body's inside. A regular cap doesnt have that texture.

      Comment


      • #4
        sorry but dont see it do u have a closer pic of it sorry for being a PIA lol but i really would like to know
        Nick
        Nick
        180G SPS Mainly
        10 Bulb T5 Starfire
        Calcium Reactor
        3 Tunze 6105's
        Profilux Controller
        ATB Return w/ wavysea
        ATB M External Skimmer


        Comment


        • #5
          Nick, under each new species, I have provided a reference. Under this reference, you can see the differences. Here is a pic from Coral Search with a close up:

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          • #6
            ok i didnt know that thanx for the help and i see much better now
            Nick
            Nick
            180G SPS Mainly
            10 Bulb T5 Starfire
            Calcium Reactor
            3 Tunze 6105's
            Profilux Controller
            ATB Return w/ wavysea
            ATB M External Skimmer


            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nyfireman3097
              ok i didnt know that thanx for the help and i see much better now
              Nick
              The smallest things make it a whole different species. Just like the Oregon tort vs the Cali Tort.

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              • #8
                what is the diffrence all i know about is the growth pattern
                Nick
                Nick
                180G SPS Mainly
                10 Bulb T5 Starfire
                Calcium Reactor
                3 Tunze 6105's
                Profilux Controller
                ATB Return w/ wavysea
                ATB M External Skimmer


                Comment


                • #9
                  I have a piece of this from reef farmers that they had a few years ago. Green plating, but with these vertical "digitata" type branches too. Interesting coral.

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                  • #10
                    I had though this may be a true M. capricornis, as I first purchased it, but it has developed coenosteum ridges and a very uneven surface. I now beleive it to be M. aequituberculata.
                    Attached Files
                    Jamie V.
                    Cologne
                    900L twin-tank system
                    Vertex Alpha 250 Skimmer, Vertex Illumina 260 LED, kalkreaktor, Vertex Biopellets+ UF-20, Vertex ROX 8 carbon
                    Acropora, Montipora, Favids and Fish

                    my blog:http://kolognekoral.blogspot.com/

                    waking escapes the dream

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                    • #11
                      Yes, Jamie, I agree it's a M. cap! Bob
                      "There might be something to this ZEOvit"

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                      • #12
                        Ahh, but Bob, a cap never has coenosteum ridges, which this coral certainly does. As it developes (the foto is 2 months ago) the ridges become more and more prominent and the small bumps are developing into regular peaks.

                        I am often a bit unsure how the species need to be defined. They are based on a skeleton, which we rarely manage to see, until death, therefore we use characteristics that are visible through/with the tissues. I have seen a few 'true' caps and this is not the same species. Now, for me, the question is, which species could it belong to. Of the foliates, it is not M. foliosa, M. delicatula, M. hodgsoni, M. cebuensis, which all have prominent coenosteum ridges to various degrees, M. friabilis, M. florida, which have a finely rough surface or M. crassituberculata, whioch has ridges over the entire surface, which means it can only be M. capricornis or M. aequituberculata. Only the latter has tuberculae and, thecal papillae which are often fused into short ridges along the colony edges.

                        I am always seeing foliate Montipora offered as 'caps', but only about 1 in 10 is actually that species. Most have come to accept all foliates as M. capricornis, which they aren't. Sounds like easy marketing and, let's face it, few would take the time to note the differences.

                        You see my argument?
                        Jamie V.
                        Cologne
                        900L twin-tank system
                        Vertex Alpha 250 Skimmer, Vertex Illumina 260 LED, kalkreaktor, Vertex Biopellets+ UF-20, Vertex ROX 8 carbon
                        Acropora, Montipora, Favids and Fish

                        my blog:http://kolognekoral.blogspot.com/

                        waking escapes the dream

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                        • #13
                          For me looks like M.Capicornis....
                          Steffen

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