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Feasibility of spawned gametes surviving in a reef tank?

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  • Feasibility of spawned gametes surviving in a reef tank?

    Hi Guys,

    There are documented cases of SPSes spawning in a reef tank due to factors like stress etc etc. However, I have not personally heard of the spawned gametes making it to maturity and forming a separate viable colony.

    What does it take for a gamet to survive and thrive in a closed system like ours? Issit possible and are there any documented cases pls?

    On a side note, this will open up a whole new way to do aquaculturing if its possible. Cheers!
    Farish

    Setup: 250G System, ATI Powermodul 10x80w T5s, 4x6100 Tunze Streams & 7095 MultiController, Deltec PF1000 CR, Deltec AP902 Skimmer, IKS, Zeovit, Artica 1Hp Chiller

  • #2
    For successful fertilization to occur requires that male and female gametes be present. Corals that broadcast spawn can be an individual sex, simultaneous hermaphrodites and non-simultaneous hermaphrodites. In either case, many corals have mechanisms that prevent them from fertilizing their own gamete so for fertilization to occur you will have to have at least 2 or more corals of the same species spawning at the same time. Alas, a specimen from one edge of the species' geographic range may spawn at a slightly different time than a specimen from a different location. Also, some non-simultaneous hemraphrodites alternate the type of gametes they release from year to year like Fungia, one year they release sperm the next year they release eggs etc.
    Broadcast spawners' larvae receive their zoox through horizontal transmission that is they aquire zoox right from the water column and in a heavily filtered aquarium, it is uncertain whether the zoox concentration and types would be suitable for a developing larvae. Once the larvae have aquired their zoox it is relatively straightforward for them to settle out and I believe that in gently filtered aquariums like those using eco-wheels, it may be possible to get coral larvae to settle out.

    Corals that brood larvae internally such as Pocillopora (although Pdam can also broadcast spawn), favia and agaricia have successfully been sexually reproduced in many lg aquarium exhibits. These corals take in sperm from the water, internally fertilize and brood their larvae, and they give their progeny a dose of zoox before release (horizontal transmission) and these are much likely to be sexually active at smaller sizes and throughout the year than broadcast spawners.
    Jake Adams
    Reef Builders

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    • #3
      From: http://www.biosbcc.net/ocean/marines...thon/crani.htm

      Sexual reproduction of coral reefs begins with a spawning event. Coral animals reproduce sexually by releasing their gametes (eggs and/or sperm) into the ocean through their mouth (broadcast spawning). These gametes unite in the water to form the fertilized egg (called a zygote). The zygote develops into an oval planula larval form that hatches and swims in the water. The planula larval form is microscopic and can sink and swim with all the cilia on its oval surface. After a time planula larvae become 'competent' and can settle on a solid surface, metamorphose into a polyp, and secrete their corallite. Then, if it is a colonial form it can asexually reproduce (clone) and form a large coral head (of many polyps/corallites, all joined together).

      Is this generally true for SPS like Acros? I didnt realise that the planula larvae can swim!
      Farish

      Setup: 250G System, ATI Powermodul 10x80w T5s, 4x6100 Tunze Streams & 7095 MultiController, Deltec PF1000 CR, Deltec AP902 Skimmer, IKS, Zeovit, Artica 1Hp Chiller

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      • #4
        http://secore.org/
        secore stands for SExual COral REproduction, and more info can be found there.
        Jake Adams
        Reef Builders

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