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  • Rowaphos

    Forum, anyone have used rowaphos along zeovit? I know zeovit do not recommend using po4 remover, but never understood why other than "not to drip po4 to zero or drop it too quick and stun the coral".
    Is there any other issue when running a good po4 remover like rowaphos with zeovit?
    Can you share your experince? How did you use it, how long, why..etc

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  • #2
    I don't have a good theory,
    I have no practical experience with Rowa.
    it might be like this.

    By adding an absorbent to the system, you can create a “competition” of PO4 between Zeovit and PO4 remover. Usually the PO4 absorbent will win this game. The first result will be the disappearance of nitrifying bacteria on the stone, which will lead to the “stagnation” of ZEOvit (stone) in the reactor. This will cause NO3 to increase and other problems.

    Probably may have a biological impact

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ohashimz View Post
      Forum, anyone have used rowaphos along zeovit? I know zeovit do not recommend using po4 remover, but never understood why other than "not to drip po4 to zero or drop it too quick and stun the coral".
      Is there any other issue when running a good po4 remover like rowaphos with zeovit?
      Can you share your experince? How did you use it, how long, why..etc

      Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
      Hi Ohashimz,

      From my research as I had the same question it has become apparent that zeostart3 which is the carbon source contains nitrates. This allows the system to remove phostphates even if the system is nitrate poor as well as giving the corals that extra nutrient source.

      If you use rowaphos it can remove to much phostphate for the beneficial bacteria to reproduce, I.e. the bacteria cultures we are trying to achieve with zeovit will not have enough phostphate to grow.

      That is my understanding I'm sure others will chime in if I am wrong

      Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk

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      • #4
        After some research here is what informstions I found:

        Beside the risk of reducing po4 too quick or reducing it to zero which we know why it's a no no,
        Rowphos contain iron which attract bacteria. So bacteria build up on the surface of the gfo and might outcompete the bacterial build up on the zeolites. This means when you change the rowaphose you might suddenly reduce the bacterial population suddenly which might creat biological imbalance.
        That's also why some times when using rowaphos you can see bacterial bloom for the first couple of days.

        That being said I do not see other issue of using gfo with zeovit honestly.

        Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ohashimz View Post
          After some research here is what informstions I found:

          Beside the risk of reducing po4 too quick or reducing it to zero which we know why it's a no no,
          Rowphos contain iron which attract bacteria. So bacteria build up on the surface of the gfo and might outcompete the bacterial build up on the zeolites. This means when you change the rowaphose you might suddenly reduce the bacterial population suddenly which might creat biological imbalance.
          That's also why some times when using rowaphos you can see bacterial bloom for the first couple of days.

          That being said I do not see other issue of using gfo with zeovit honestly.

          Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
          If this is the case then will removing the zeolite media cause a biological imbalance every time it needs to be exchanged?



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          • #6
            Originally posted by HarryGriggs View Post
            If this is the case then will removing the zeolite media cause a biological imbalance every time it needs to be exchanged?



            Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk
            Yes it will, hence you are suppose to remove 90% and keep 10% so you help re establish the bacterial population quickly. If you change all the zeolite with new one, system can go through a mini cycle.
            The imbalance I referred to is the sharp reduction on the bacteria. Similar to when you remove big parts of the rocks or substrate, system go through a mini cycle.
            Remember we are talking here about big change in the bacterial population, not saying such events will remove all the bacteria....make sense?


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            • #7
              Originally posted by ohashimz View Post
              Yes it will, hence you are suppose to remove 90% and keep 10% so you help re establish the bacterial population quickly. If you change all the zeolite with new one, system can go through a mini cycle.
              The imbalance I referred to is the sharp reduction on the bacteria. Similar to when you remove big parts of the rocks or substrate, system go through a mini cycle.
              Remember we are talking here about big change in the bacterial population, not saying such events will remove all the bacteria....make sense?


              Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
              I understand your thought process but when you consider the bacterial concentrations on the zeovit media compared to rowaphos I do not believe the rowaphos would cause a significant impact at all. We must also remember there are substantial bacteria populations in the water column, sand bed and rock work which would be far higher than that on the surface area of the rowaphos.

              I have never seen any bacterial mass grow on rowaphos when you can quite clearly see it on the zeovit media.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by HarryGriggs View Post
                I understand your thought process but when you consider the bacterial concentrations on the zeovit media compared to rowaphos I do not believe the rowaphos would cause a significant impact at all. We must also remember there are substantial bacteria populations in the water column, sand bed and rock work which would be far higher than that on the surface area of the rowaphos.

                I have never seen any bacterial mass grow on rowaphos when you can quite clearly see it on the zeovit media.

                Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk
                Yeh..maybe.
                As I said my earlier sharing is my thoughts and personal conclusion. I might be wrong lol

                Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ohashimz View Post
                  Yeh..maybe.
                  As I said my earlier sharing is my thoughts and personal conclusion. I might be wrong lol

                  Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
                  Yes and same here, I'm not trying to say any one person's opinion is wrong I'm just trying to put across my thoughts in what I hope reads as a constructive manner. Sorry if any offence has been caused as that was not my intention! We all want to help each other at the end of the day

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HarryGriggs View Post
                    Yes and same here, I'm not trying to say any one person's opinion is wrong I'm just trying to put across my thoughts in what I hope reads as a constructive manner. Sorry if any offence has been caused as that was not my intention! We all want to help each other at the end of the day

                    Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk
                    Oh no no, there is no offence at all. At all.
                    I am really trying to find the answer and I recognize that I do not have it...

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                    • #11
                      I would continue this topic.
                      The day before yesterday, I went to the store of the local Korallen-zucht dealer (I always visit him on Friday) and immediately found in his demo tank on the zeovit system that the corals began to look even more beautiful, as if they had made a “Polish” on the corals. I asked him what he added? His answer was "Rowaphos." When asked if he has phosphates, he answered no. Rowaphos, in addition to phosphates, also removes silicates.
                      My aquarium is in the process of switching to the Zeovit system and recently, due to the high level of phosphates, I have to dose 18 drops of Zeofood daily to keep them 0.
                      He advised me to put “Rowaphos” 50% of the recommended dose for removing the load on the system, and after the next change of zeolites to reduce to 25%.

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                      • #12
                        Problem I see is that the natural Zeovit process take a long time to recover high phos levels and if an alternate method is not used likely outcome is a massive green hair algae (or some other) outbreak and lots of unhappy corals. People using other carbon dosing methods report nitrates coming down fast but phos taking significantly longer.

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                        • #13
                          RowaPhos does remove silicates also but using it on a system which is running nutrient poor stabile can cause issues because of the quick changes of the PO4 level. This is common and was observed in many systems. Basically if you like to you can give it a try but my recommendation is to do this very slowly, starting with a small quantity which is slowly been increased.

                          If you are able to keep the PO4 level stabile low with the ZeoVit components I would recommend to work without a additional absorber.

                          G.Alexander

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                          • #14
                            Im thinking that bacteria include phosphates in their biomass which is still available to corals. Rowaphos wil bind Po4 and make in unavailable to corals

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                            • #15
                              Considering a little rowa to help bring phosphates down. My po4 is 0.03 but I have a lot of algae in the tank so I estimate my actual level is much higher. I know eventually the zeolite and various components will bring this in line but I think a small amount may help things along.

                              I do not have a rowa reactor but can put the rowaphos in a 100 micro filter sock or in the included bag and on top of the zeolite in my zeovit reactor.

                              Any thoughts

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