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Hippo Tang health concern. Not Ich!

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  • Hippo Tang health concern. Not Ich!

    Ok you fish gurus, I have a blue hippo tang that is nearly 7 years old. He has done wonderful and grown considerably. He has always been fat and happy with a tremendous appetite. Lately I have noticed he appears emaciated. Pinched in at the belly and ribs showing. I feed a variety of flake, frozen and pellet. Mysis, Formula one, prime reef, frozen mysis, frozen plankton, spectra, formula two, etc. His appetite remains voracious and he behaves as goofy as he ever has. Any one with any suggestions?

    As far as tank specs and fish load, all appear healthy and have excellent appetites.
    225 gallon mixed reef.

    1 sailfin tang 5"
    1 hippo tang 4"
    1 paellini tang 3"
    4 false percs
    2 pink skunks
    1 flame angel 3"
    1 rabbit fish 2"
    2 yellow chromis 1"
    1 orchid dotty back

    TIA
    CAReefer
    265 gallon SPS tank. Bubble King 300 Internal, MRC CR-6 Calc Reactor. 3 400 watt 20k Helios. 90 gallon Frag tank plumbed into main display.

  • #2
    Parasite??
    10x3x2 FOWLR (for now)
    BK400ext
    RD12 return, 2 RD12 closed loop, wavebox with extension
    MRC kalkmixer
    IKS

    Comment


    • #3
      Greetings All !


      CAReefer,
      This kind of stuff drives us nuts, doesn't it? How is his color? Any "unusual" behavior? How is he competing for food within the social structure (... as distinct from appetite, which you already mentioned ...)?

      My twisted little brain ends up along one of two pathways: Pathological, or Dietary.

      Moonpod's endo-parasite guess is a definite possibility. If (1) his color has remained "relatively" consistent despite the loss of weight, and/or (2) there is some "new" erratic behavior (... uncharacteristically rapid/spasmatic movement, irritability, inability to avoid occassionally hitting objects, ... etc ...), and/or (3) there has been a change in fecal color and consistency ... then there is some comfirmation of endo-parasitic infestation present. To be certain, you're going to need to see the beasties with a microscope ... no fun.

      While it is hard ... useless? ... even dangerous? ... to recommend a specific chemical without knowing the specific parasite, orally administering (... feeding ...) Fenbendazole, Levamisole, and Piperazine have been proven effective against Nematode ("roundworm") infections, and Parziquantel has been proven effective against Cestode ("tapeworm") infestation (Fish Disease. Diagnosis and Treatment. Naga, 2000).

      These are powerful chemicals, and should not be introduced into either your specimens' diet, or, into your system without a sound determination that Nematodes/Cestodes are present. Nor should such administration take place without some serious further reading.

      ...


      Hopefully, what you're seeing is dietary. This is why I asked about competitive feeding behavior. After all, the fact that a specimen has a healthy appetite does not in and of itself demonstrate that it is acquiring adequate nutrition, especially as system populations grow and mature over extended periods of time. The gradual degradation of coloration and/or emergence of "lateral line" type physical symptons might indicate a dietary issue.

      Happily, there is an easy "fix" for grazers ... Gracilaria. The Sailfin and Paellini tangs, and the Rabbitfish, will also appreciate the addition of Gracilaria into their diet.

      HTH ...
      Last edited by mesocosm; 07-30-2005, 10:26 AM.
      "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."
      Hunter S. Thompson

      Comment


      • #4
        I was leaning towards competition too..

        If you want to isolate the problem, place this fish in a quarantine tank and feed heavily to bring his health back up.

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow, thanks guys. I am leaning more towards dietary. After taking a close look at what I have been feeding over the lifespan of the fish, I realized the feedings tend heavily towards carnivore diet. I believe I will take this approach and increase the vegatitative quantity within the diet.

          His color remains vivid, He remains about #2 in the overall standings during feedings, and is not out competed. Behavior has remained consistant over the long term and shows no changes at this time. Behavior is one of the reasons this concerns me. He has been one of, if not the most personable characters in my population. Loves to dart around the tank, surfaces, grabs a mouthful of air, dives, releases the bubbles and chases them back to the surface. Quite comical to watch.

          Thanks for all the help.
          CAReefer
          265 gallon SPS tank. Bubble King 300 Internal, MRC CR-6 Calc Reactor. 3 400 watt 20k Helios. 90 gallon Frag tank plumbed into main display.

          Comment


          • #6
            As a generality tangs are considered grazers and primary herbivores. However I believe that the Hippo and the Naso tangs are actually primary planktinovores and secondary grazers. Just an FYI.
            10x3x2 FOWLR (for now)
            BK400ext
            RD12 return, 2 RD12 closed loop, wavebox with extension
            MRC kalkmixer
            IKS

            Comment


            • #7
              Greetings All !

              You know, it seems to me that most folks become interested in ZEOvit in pursuit of SPS coloration and growth ... and that's great. But oddly enough, this thread reminds me of a few of the primary reasons that I became fascinated with this methodology: The opportunity to participate in the enrichment of the theory and application of reefkeeping (... in a way that most "status quo" cyber-personalities and the "gurus/authorities" seem tragically, and inexplicably, incapable of ...), and the extraordinary expertise/experience of the people within this community. I get to think "new" thoughts, and hang out with others who are doing the same thing ...

              ... It really is extraordinary when you think about it ... ... ...


              Originally posted by moonpod
              As a generality tangs are considered grazers and primary herbivores. However I believe that the Hippo and the Naso tangs are actually primary planktinovores and secondary grazers. Just an FYI.
              Case in point ... I was poised to gently chide moonpod for the assertion that Naso lituratus and Paracanthurus hepatus were primarily planktonivorus ... such an assertion goes against what we all know to be true, yes? Then I remembered that I was in ZeoVille, and that the knowledge base of this community was not to be taken lightly.

              Guess what ... it turns out that in the wild Paracanthurus hepatus is primarily planktonivorus.

              Biology: Occurs in clear, current-swept terraces of seaward reefs. Observed in loose aggregations 1 or 2 meters above the bottom; juveniles and subadults typical in groups near isolated Pocillopora eydouxi coral heads and when alarmed hide themselves tightly among the branches. Feeds on zooplankton (Ref. 9710). Relatively uncommon and highly localized (Ref. 1602, 9710). A very popular and hardy aquarium fish.

              Extracted from:
              http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/spec...esname=hepatus

              (... underlining is mine ...)
              Blue Tang food item data can be found at:
              http://www.fishbase.org/TrophicEco/F...pecies=hepatus

              Great call, MoonPod ...



              Naso Tangs are considered to be primarily herbivorus.

              Biology: Found in areas of coral, rock, or rubble of lagoon and seaward reefs. Feeds mainly on leafy brown algae (Sargassum and Dictyota). Sometimes in large aggregations (Ref. 37792). The species is very seldom poisonous (Ref. 4795). Pair-spawning has been observed.

              Extracted from:
              http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/spec...name=lituratus
              Check out the above quote again ... "The species is very seldom poisonous (Ref. 4795)." Poisonous Naso tangs?! ...

              ... ... the mind boggles ... ...


              The things you can learn when you question the status quo, and keep an open mind ...
              ... and do the literature research ... go figure ...




              "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."
              Hunter S. Thompson

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